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The Mineral chambersite

Chambersite Pyramidal Crystal

Chambersite is a rare mineral of the boracite group, a solid solution series of chloro-borates, with Boracite, Chambersite, and Ericaite as the main members. It is the manganese-rich end member of this group. Chambersite is known for its equidimensional triangular crystals, which form in a lovely purple color but are always very small. Chambersite is named after Chambers County, Texas, where it was first discovered in 1957.

Chemical Formula

Mn3B7O13Cl

Color

Light to dark purple

Crystal System

Orthorhombic

Properties

Streak
White
Hardness
7
Transparency
Transparent to nearly opaque
Specific Gravity
3.5
Luster
Vitreous
Cleavage
None
Fracture
Uneven
Tenacity
Brittle
Other ID Marks
Darkens upon prolonged exposure to sunlight

Crystal Habits

Crystals are in tetrahedral habit, often well formed looking like a pyramid. Crystals are almost always in isolated single floater crystals that are small in size. Seldom in penetrating or connected triangular crystals. May have triangular etchings in crystal faces, and terminations may be slightly modified. Crystals convert to an orthorhombic crystal structure upon cooling after their formation, though the isometric shape of the tetrahedron is preserved.

3D Crystal Atlas

Additional Information

Composition
Manganese chloro-borate
In Group
Borates; Anhydrous Borates
Striking Features
Crystal habits, hardness, and mode of occurrence
Environment
In salt domes.
Rock Type
Sedimentary

Uses

Chambersite is a rare collector's mineral, with its well-formed, small crystals making highly collectible specimens for thumbnail collectors.

Noteworthy Localities

The two best-known occurences for Chambersite are Barbers Hill, Mont Belvieu, Chambers Co., Texas; and the Venice Salt dome, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.

Common Mineral Associations

Halite, Anhydrite, Gypsum

chambersite Photos



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